You Make a Difference Your Child’s Education Success

Parents/guardians are valuable partners with teachers in the education of a child. If you have time, contact the teacher or principal and volunteer to come into the school and help out. If you are unable to do this, there are still many things you can do at home to help foster your child's learning.

TALK to your child. Almost from birth, a child is ready to express themselves. A first response is cooing and gurgling. Later they pick up a few words and sense the rhythm of language. Help your child to add words to their speaking vocabulary. The more words they use in ordinary conversation, the more words will have meaning for them when on the printed page.

LISTEN to your child. Children need many opportunities to express themselves. Encourage your child to talk about things they have seen or done. The more a child talks, the better they will likely read. Do pay attention when they talk and read to you. Suggest they read first to themselves to be sure they know all the words. or done. The more a child talks, the better they will likely read. Do pay attention when they talk and read to you. Suggest they read first to themselves to be sure they know all the words. 

READ to your child. Every time you read to them, you are building an appreciation of books and reading. A child’s  listening and interest levels are above their current reading level.  A child who has been read to is usually more excited to read themselves. Reading becomes more important to them.

HELP your child in the first stages of reading, by saying the unknown words. If they are in a later reading stage, work out a word with them by looking at a picture that suggests the new word and see if it makes sense to them.

TEACH your child how to care for books and they will learn to regard books as friends.

TAKE your child on trips. Even a short trip will excite their curiosity and interest in the world around them. Point out interesting things and give them new words and explain their meaning.

BUILD a reading atmosphere at home. Have books, magazines, newspapers, etc., around the house. Let your child see you reading frequently.

PRAISE your child. Children always respond to the positive. Honest praise increases self-worth.

GIVE your child responsibility. This allows him/her to earn recognition and to gain satisfaction from accomplishments.

SEE that your child has good habits of attendance. When absent from school, they miss valuable class time and work and can fall behind the rest of the class. Help them make up their schoolwork.

ENCOURAGE your child to visit the public library often after going with them first.  Don't tell them what books to select. Poor readers, may choose easy books at first. When their confidence builds and reading skills improve, they will begin choosing more difficult books.

SHOW a real interest in school. Your attitude can influence your child's interest in school. You and the teacher are partners in the important job of educating your child.